When you can trace your ancestry to Attila the Hun and it’s full of poets, painters, war heroes and people with passions for monster hunting or UFOs – there is always plenty to chat about. When your home is also one of the last great Irish Castle Estates still in the hands of its founding family, every door opens onto another story rich with personal connections.
Canter through Castle Leslie Estate on horseback

Canter through Castle Leslie Estate on horseback

Canter through Castle Leslie Estate on horseback
The Leslie family have welcomed many illustrious guests over the years including royalty, WB Yeats, Winston Churchill (a relation) and Mick Jagger.
Maybe you will feel the eclectic creative energy as you follow in their steps, gazing on Glaslough – the magical “green lake” – that first enticed “fighting bishop” John Leslie (he famously defeated Oliver Cromwell’s forces) to buy the estate in 1664.
The Green Lake and boathouse at Castle Leslie Estate
Falconry at the Castle Leslie Estate
Left: The Green Lake and boathouse. Right: Falconry at the Castle Leslie Estate.
Which bedroom will be yours in this sumptuous castle hotel? The Mauve Room where an Earl hid in the big white wardrobe in order to surprise a Queen? The Nursery where the giant dollhouse has been ingeniously turned into a bathroom? Original features, antiques and curios all have their tales to tell.
The Mauve Room, Castle Leslie
Castle Leslie's Red Room
Left: The Mauve Room. Right: The Red Room.
With its magnificent four poster bed, The Red Room is blessed with the most stunning views of Glaslough lake and the pleasure gardens. Except for the noble French `armoire' cupboard, all the furniture in the room came from Peruggia in Italy. The huge panelled bath is the first bath ever installed in Ireland. The Red Room has accommodated numerous famous guests, including W.B. Yeats, the Irish poet.
The Famine Monument in Glaslough Village
The Famine Monument in Glaslough Village
Outside, 1,000 acres of rolling parkland refresh body and spirit, while the four-mile Famine Wall, built in the 1840s as a relief project, reminds how Christina Leslie conscientiously helped local people in those times of hardship by providing employment and soup kitchens. A monument in Glaslough Village marks their gratitude.
Distant times now, as you walk or horse ride through the parkland, luxuriate in the spa, savour seasonal temptations in the restaurant or chat to locals in Conor’s Bar in The Lodge. Yes, there’s always plenty to chat about.
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